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Design

MTalks—Elizabeth Diller in conversation with Andrew Mackenzie

25 Oct 2017

Elizabeth Diller’s firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) has been called a ‘maverick’ of the architecture world. The New York firm—a partnership between Elizabeth Diller, Ricardo Scofidio, Charles Renfro and Benjamin Gilmartin—is famous for integrating architecture with visual arts and performing arts in a groundbreaking approach to projects big and small.

Establishing its identity through independent, theoretical and self-generated projects before coming to international prominence with two of the most important planning initiatives in New York—the High Line and the redesign of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts campus—DS+R is known for its fearless approach, unafraid to play with new materials, tamper with space and bring architecture to life in a way that makes you look twice.

On this Wednesday evening in October, Elizabeth Diller joins MPavilion for a very special MTalks to discuss her, and her firm’s, work in conversation with Andrew Mackenzie, director of URO Publications, consultant at City Lab, and notable widely-published design correspondent. Put it in the diary—you will not want to miss this.

Content: MPavilion

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